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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 297 (some duplicates have been removed)
and that is it for march 25th and changing the facade from the grass to the metal and we can do that presentation as well. i would ask the board to consider maybe starting our meetings at 9:00, we have a very complex project and i understand, we have never had a time limit for when this board meeting would attend but it appears that most need to leave at noon and i would ask for consideration that we could start earlier, i can start as early as anybody can available and but we really need to start thinking about starting earlier, because there is a lot and it is a huge project and a lot of material and we don't want to keep disappointing the public that we are going to present something and we don't have the time. please allow us some consideration. >> i think that is an important request. any other... i am happy to start the board meetings at 9:00 a.m. if there is no objection, we can certainly. >> and i want to apologize to those of you who are here and not getting to present. >> i also just asked the board members if they can let me know in advance when they have meetings schedule afterwards so i can
a code clean up and nick cal changes made to the planning code. over time as we noted some clarifications and corrections that needed to be made. before i invite anne marie rogers from the planning department to kind of walk you through some of those changes, there is a nonsubstantive amendment that needs to be made on page 93, line 24. basically refers to section 315 of the code which has been deleted recently and is now section 415. so, with that i want to invite anne marie rogers here. >> thank you, supervisor. and welcome to the board. anne marie rogers from the planning department and i'm here to go over a little bit of this pretty large ordinance that is before you. as you know, the people of the city of san francisco and the board of supervisors care deeply about the planning code and as a result of that it is amended about 50 times per year. that results invariably in some mistakes and some unintended consequences. as supervisor tang described, there is one ordinance found since the introduction last week, and i do have a couple other changes that i'd like to describe as well as j
're not talking about secular model of reform meaning changes to church teaching on matters such as abortion or birth control. instead they're talking about changes in business management in the vatican towards making the bureaucracy here more transparent, that is both internally and externally, making it clearer who's making decisions and why and also doing a better job communicating with the outside world towards making it more accountable. that is the idea that there ought to be penalties for poor performance and towards making it efficient. the notion being is that there thinking in centuries may have cut it once upon a while but in a 21st century world it simply doesn't do it anymore. that's what these cardinals mean by reform and they have embraced pope francis tasman who can deliver it. whether it plays out in practice that way, of course, remains to be seen. >> brown: is there an expectation that on one key matter the sexual abuse scandals that he has to do something fairly quickly,? whether it's make a gesture or take action? >> well, i think it's very clear to anyone who's been pay
from the agency to make the change a policy change, a permanent change. and thank you very much. >> who would have thought that ten years after the sunshine ordinance was adopted we would be arguing over a legal term called attachment. the plain reading, the ordinary reading that any person would get would mean the inclusion in the body of the minutes. and that is what the public probably understood in 1999, when it adopted the sunshine ordinance. the concept is attachment is really a legal concept and it is actually said as attached hereto and incorporated herein and we don't get that i think that it is quasi legal ordinances in. the government guide is an unsupported comment from the city attorney, there is no opinion, there is no justification for it and it is not worth the sense that it is written on. if it were, supported with some legal basis, of case law, differently. different results. it is the task force's job to determine these issues, not the city attorney's. that is what it is there for. it is the determinations are enforcable. the fact that mr. herrera has repeatedly poked
anything about. when the ethics commission itself, changed our practice, to put the 150-word statements in the body of the document, we did not do it because we thought that we were in any kind of violation up until then. we did it because we thought that it was responsive, because we thought it would reduce frustration and the members of the public would find it evidence of good faith. but not because we thought that it was required. so i think that it is a good thing to see that the library commission is now prepared to raise for its future practice doing the same thing. but i don't see it as required or nor do i see it as abrogating the filing, if there were a filing before now that would not solve that, i don't think that there was such a violation, i think that mr. hartz was right about that. on two other points that were raised and then i will wrap up. the statement that the 150-word statements or summaries as the ordinance provides, are not generated or validated by the city commission, that whose minutes they are part of, does seem to me to be a useful notification to the public
to take that position. portman explained his change of heart in "the columbus dispatch". he said it began two years ago, when his college-age son told his family that he is gay. wall street backed up a bit as the week ended. that ended a ten-day winning streak by the dow jones industrial average-- its longest in 17 years. the dow industrial average lost 25 points to close at 14,514. the nasdaq fell nearly 10 points to close at 3,249. for the week, the dow gained just under 1%. the nasdaq rose a tenth of a percent. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: thousands of activists gathered this week for one of the conservative movement's biggest events. "newshour" congressional corresspondent kwame holman was there. >> reporter: for four decades the conservative political action conference known as "c- pac" has served as a barometer for republican politics. and this year, the g.o.p.'s future direction is the issue for more than 10,000 delegates who've been meeting just outside washington. at the last few gatherings of c- pac, the focus was on taking back the
of a new pope present a chance for institutional change? plus, another installment of this week in voter suppression. >>> how to walk the fine line when protecting our streets. but first, the rape case igniting a national conversation and turning one small town upside down. good morning. i'm joy reid filling in for melissa harris-perry. a note of caution for parents watching this morning. we're getting started with a very sensitive story, so you may want to send children out of the room. this week two high school football stars from steubenville, ohio, went on trial after being accused of raping a 16-year-old girl from just across the ohio river, in nearby west virginia. now a crime and justice story in a small town like steubenville isn't usually the makings of national news and the alleged events on the night in question are sadly not remarkable for their rarity. we know that one in six american women is a survivor of an attempted or completed sexual assault. and we know 44% of survivors are under the age of 18. but thanks to an unusual aspect of this case, we all know now in graphic d
and park to intimidate people. he and others had every intention to cancel or change the format of the planned discussion of the golden gate to be held at the common wealth club, any e-mails were instantly deletes not because of the deep commitment to the record retention policy, but because ginsberg knows that the sunshine law requires disclosures he is not stupid. had it been true that the destruction was implementing the policy and this should have been stated to mr. wooding at the outset. the disclosure that there were once e-mails but they were indeed destroyed according to regulations would have led to the next requirement in the sunshine ordinance which is to assist in referring him to someone who could help him with his records request. miss gong should have referred him to the department of technology did recovering the deleted e-mails since her technology staff could not help. let us not kid ourselves mr. ginsberg attempted a cover up of an ill advised attempt to influence the private entity to have a open panel discussion about the development in the famous park and w
. >>> crews are busy working on some big changes on the golden gate bridge, which go into effect next wednesday. that is when toll takers go away, and a new electronics system goes online. drivers will have to use fast track. drivers who do nothing will be caught by cameras, and a toll bill will be sent to them in the mail. >>> on wall street today, technology stocks helped drive the major indexes down. the dow was office 90 points, or .6%. the nasdaq dropped 32, or about 1%, and closed at 3,222. leading the tech stocks on their decline was oracle, which reported an unexpected drop in 3rd quarter sales. the redwood city based company took a beating with investors with its stock down almost 10% today. analysts say oracle effects other tech stocks disproportionately, because it reports its earnings earlier than most other tech companies. >>> sales force.com has approved a 4 for 1 stock split. the change will take effect on april 3, increasing the number of shares from 400 million, to 1.6 billion. the shares of the software management company closed at a record high on march 1, when sale
of that is going to change when gay couples are allowed to do the same. the fact is that throughout the nation's history, gay couples and gay individuals have been paying their taxes, and by paying our taxes, we help support all the legal benefits and protections of marriage. according to the government accountability office, there are over 01100 legal benefits and protections that are given to married couples. we have been subsidizing those throughout the nation's history. yet we are unable to take advantage of those same incentives to marry. that cannot be constitutional. host: let me ask you this. should the court be jumping in at this point? one of the arguments being made by the lawyers for proposition 8, today's oral argument, is that there is a social movement happening. polls are showing more people in favor. let that take place. let states decide what they want to do. is there a role for the supreme court? caller: of course there is. this cannot be accomplished in a piecemeal, state-by-state basis. most of the legal benefits of marriage come from the federal government. but me give yo
everything that we can to combat the threat of climate change, that we're going to be creating jobs and economic opportunity in the first place. they are going to be a great team. these are some of my top priorities going forward. >> ifill: moniz is an m.i.t. physicist who runs an energy initiative on new ways to produce power and curb emissions. he also served as undersecretary of energy during the clinton administration. mccarthy already works in the administration as assistant administrator for the e.p.a.'s office of air and radiation. she has run state environmental agencies in connecticut and massachusetts, working for five governors including mitt romney. moniz and mccarthy would replace outgoing cabinet members steven chu and lisa jackson. early last month the president also tapped business executive sally jewel to replace ken salazar as interior secretary. the nominees face major challenges. one imminent decision involves debate over approval of the keystone ex-seal pipeline that would move crude oil from canada to the gulf. the project has drawn environmental protests but a
to what we heard from them in the past. they want to change medicare for people starting in 2024 and turn it into more of a voucher program where people go out and buy their own private health insurance. they want to block grant things like medicaid and food stamps so that it goes through state funding. it changes from an open entitlement program to something that will only support people as long as the money lasts. and they want to unwind some things that federal government spends money on, like housing giants fannie mae and freddie mac. but these are really policies that we have heard from them before. there wasn't a lot of new substance there. >> brown: in fact you were at the press conference. i was watching a reporter pointed that out to paul ryan. he was sort of... we saw a little bit of it. he was unapologetically continuing on, no matter what happened in the election, right? >> there's a feeling on the part of the house republicans that although the presidential election was lost for the republican party, the house republicans feel like they still maintain the majority in the hous
of politics. let's talk in a broad sense about the changing country and the changing political parties. >> one of the major things that we forget, because we're so comfortable with the united states being a two-party system and that being what democracy is or at least is here, we forget that during the early republic, there wasn't a two- party system, that the founding fathers hated parties and thought they would be terrible for democracy. there was this generation, particularly martin van buren who said we need to have an ordered, structured system, of making political things happen and that's the parties. we have to have a philosophy. we have to show up together and vote on the same thing and we have to hang together, or these sections of the country or these differences in the democracy will spin out of control, and actually they did. >> how did washington, d.c. change over these 12 years? >> it grew like crazy. at the beginning, of course, it was basically just kind of a big -- with trees and dirt and then there would be a house and a building there. then it became actually a city and it b
the law having changed there. it puts the federal government in an odd place. states have voted one way. the federal government trying to figure out how to work arounder around that. many have acknowledged that the country is in a serious conversation about marijuana. the president, you remember, went on to--spoke with barbara walters and had this to say. >> do you think that marijuana should be legalized? >> i wouldn't go that far but i think at this point washington and colorado, you've seen the voters speak on this issue. as it is, the federal government has a lot to do when it comes to criminal prosecutions. it does not sense from a prioritization point of view for us to focus on recreational drug users in a state that has already said that under state law that is legal. >> michael: that confusion puts to light by "huffington post" in a poll they have there that say 51% of adults should be exempt from federal drug laws, and 30% say those laws should be enforced in colorado. it becomes for the justice department an issue how if the state says one thing the federal department should d
of their dollars when poor people are paying a disproportionate amount. so david throw said things don't change, we do. there's going to have to be some changes going on with individuals and their philosophies if we're going to bring this nation around to propelling this growth or we're going to fall down again because they are not going to move. >> when you look at the fact that speaker boehner wrote and this is an op-ed that says, obama's outreach is nice but where's the leadership? if we're going to find bipartisan solutions, the president will have to move beyond the same proposals as democrat democratic dogma. aren't they saying, there can be an agreement as long as everybody agrees with me? >> yes, he is. but he's trying to do other things with these kinds of press conferences and op-eds. by the way, you spent plenty of time with the president. i have, too. saying he's not a leadership is going to get under your skin. that's a cheap shot. he doesn't care. he knows who he is and he's the president of the united states. john boehner knows very well indeed and all of the republican leaders know
or going into electric vehicles or getting everybody to change their habits, one of the habits that we want to continue having is planting trees. and so every year for the last 8 years, we have select a signatory to plant and we have taken the liberties of honoring people that have contributed to the quality of life for all of us. in past years, people like rosa parks, caesar chavez, people that we know and are familiar with, along with people that we are not that familiar with but have made some great contributions. today we thought we would take this opportunity to celebrate an icon of san francisco. the brown twin sisters have been with us for many decades. mary is here today, she's here in celebration and memory of her sister as we all are and we want to take this opportunity to use the arbor day to have a cedar tree, a tree that will grow taller than mary or i. it will grow to be a hundred feet tall. it will be a tree that will be celebrated here in san francisco for generations to come and we thought it would be not only appropriate, but we thought it would be our honor by planting
a change in the way business is done here would affect other states who may be lined up also with laws that preempt or somehow trump federal law? >> well, as deputy solicitor general said. if the federal law is just viewed as a floor here. for example, if arizona wins, then he said states can impose additional requirements on registration, and the federal lawl itself becomes a nullity. that is the fear of a lot of organizations from the orgses that brought the challenge to the league of women voters that filed an amicus brief supporting the challengers. congress' intent here was to make registration easier. they fear that if arizona wins, then other states are going to impose other kinds of requirements, not just proof of citizenship. so that is the real concern. if arizona loses, there is no change. on the other hand, the final word may rest with congress. whatever the supreme court does, congress could go and amend the national voter registration act. >> ifill: sounds like there could be a consequential ruling. >> it's definitely a very important case and playing out against this bac
here today to change the image of this community from violence and killing and all those negative things to positive wisdom for the glory of god. would you be so kind to join me in the word of prayer. we are here today in the community. we want to this you forgiving the city officials, the people, all those responsible for beginning this process and you have completed, that's the joy of completion. and you said like wisdom, let him ask you give us all men -- wisdom is more precious than gold and silver. god we claim that and thank you for this neighborhood and for those responsible in thy name we pray, in god, amenen. >> thank you pastor walker. and we would like to thank pastor bailey from the church and for an allowing us to have this construction site on their parking lot. thank you to baptist church for today's celebration as well. thank you very much let's now take a moment to hear from our library neighbor. it's always wonderful to celebrate with poetry. i would like to introduce alejandro -- >> thank you. you cannot imagine how happy i am here today. i remember whether the
, your throat or tongue swells, you get hives, vision changes or eye pain, or problems passing urine. other side effects include dry mouth and constipation. nothing can reverse copd. spiriva helps me breathe better. (blowing sound) ask your doctor about spiriva. it's delicious. so now we've turned her toffee into a business. my goal was to take an idea and make it happen. i'm janet long and i formed my toffee company through legalzoom. i never really thought i would make money doing what i love. [ robert ] we created legalzoom to help people start their business and launch their dreams. go to legalzoom.com today and make your business dream a reality. at legalzoom.com we put the law on your side. >>> at the top of the show, we asked you why you are awake? dan, what do you have? >> a couple of tweets. i'm awake from my daily vocabulary lesson. thanks for explaining the word crater. >> i'm here to educate everyone. >> i'm up to see what tie you chose today. come on, bill, you can do better. >> i know. i chickened out. i had one, it was a little more risque, tomorrow i'll go bold. all r
now. to me it means there will be a change, a positive change coming out of this. this decision is actually made. >> fighting for my rights, for the lights of the community and i'm showing i care and that i want equal treatment under the law. >> while we may disagree with other clergy who feel differently we still stand with the couples and the families that are waiting for this day of justice to happen. >> reporter: as you can see people have been bringing rainbow flags, signs, wearing t- shirts, all in support of a reinstatement of gay marriage in the state of california. if not nationwide. i have been looking around the crowd in the area and i haven't seen anybody who is in support of proposition eight. of course that is the gay marriage ban but this is going to last until eight tonight. we will be here and we will bring you more live pictures coming up in the 6:00 news. reporting live. channel 2news. >> some cities in california are showing support for gays and lesbians during the two days of arguments. in long beach the gay flag is hanging at city hall. the mayor there s
and paste change. it is it just changed and sauled a sacrament. it reassuring that pope francis's version of being modern is not retooling the church to be more cool but take the unchanging gospel and advance by personal relationship than religious ritual. when i was in israel last month urn ared to the place thatthought to be the tomb much jesus. both sites had one thing in common. they were empty. as a christian who celebrates easter, it is not important to be adored by the world but to be known to be the one who conquered death and invites us to be with him. for the jews, pass overreminds us that god never forgets us. he overcomes all obstackles to set us free. having hope and confidence regardless election indicators makes me crazy so be it. i rather be crazy and confident than just plain crazy. [ applause ] he a founding pastor of a church that started with 30 people and quickly grew into a church that had a congeigation of thousands. >> jesus rising from the grave and gathering his followers together on that mountain and giving this message. go into all . world and make disciples. d
court to strike down the ban as unconstitutional. the president once opposed gay marriage, but changed his stance during his re-election campaign. he said today he and the country have evolved. >> when the supreme court essentially called the question by taking this case about california's law, i didn't feel like that was something that this administration could avoid. i felt it was important for us to articulate what i believe and what this administration stands for. >> sreenivasan: 200 congressional democrats also filed a brief today urging the court to overturn the california ban. they join more than 100 prominent republicans who voiced their support earlier in the week. the justices will hear oral arguments in late march. a federal judge in california has cut a $1 billion damage award in the apple-samsung fight by nearly half. samsung will now have to pay apple just under $600 million for infringing on smart phone and tablet computer patents. the judge also ordered a new trial on some of apple's allegations in the case. wall street ended the week with small gains. the dow jones ind
of the university of central florida. is a student had planned to kill people near his dorm but changed his mind killed themselves. >> police say james seev sku marn had some homemade bombs, and an assault weapon, a handgun, and under the rows of ammunition in his dorm long. authorities believe he pulled a fire alarm just after midnight common plant tissue students said they left the building. one student called police and is believed the south as iras may have made the suspect rethink his plan. >> first soda now cigarettes. >> new york city mayor michael bloomberg is starting tobacco sales. he wants to require store to keep tobacco products out of sight unless an adult is buying something or employes are restocking. the goal is to crack down on young people smoking. the proposal would also ban selling tobacco products at a discount. there would be also the tougher penalties. >> 4:22 is the time. we will take a break. giving you a quick look at the toll plaza as you make your way toward the oakland side of the toll plaza heading into san francisco. what we're looking at the east bay temperatures
, was to cause trouble for yourself. even when a whole new vocabulary, wmd, homeland, regime change, freedom fries, coalition of the willing, was being confected and infiltrated into our national dialogue. the mainstream media was useless. even when the culture of the country i.t. itself, country music was drafted into service with twisting appeals to vengeance for 9/11. remember how you felt? no wonder cheney's arrogant to this guy. no wonder bush is effectively clueless. no wander the war hawks are shameless. all of them together got away with it. it was the people of silence. the newspaper editors. the network executives. the mostly respected columnists who know what they did and did not do who are wrestling now not with the history of the american invasion of iraq, we're all doing that, but their own history in doing nothing to ask the hard questions. persisting again and again with that hardest question of all. why? it had to be answered. was it being answered in principle and the language consistent with our american traditions? no. we're joined right now by nbc's great investigative c
in segregatio that 81% that andrew mentioned is not going to change its mind as it grows older. >> rose: we conclude with a conversation with the remarkable young filmmaker named adam leone. his new movie is called "gimme the loot." >> we really wanted to show a part of new york that isn't seen so much on movies and t.v. right now, i think. because a lot of people i know talk about how new york has become a mall and the big box stores. that's a part of new york but there's still this energy and there are these neighborhoods that are very much ale a very much still neighborhoods and so we wanted to go out into the bronx and all over the city and show that. >> rose: same-sex marriage and "gimme the loot" when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: it is an important week for the united states supreme court. starting on tuesday, the court will hearing amounts in two cases involving the legality of same-sex marriage. the nine justices will first consider an appeal of an earlier ruling that rendered california's
data, i think a decisive majority of americans are in favor of this and that's unlikely to change. that will probably only increase. california several years ago, the people of california rejected gay marriage and put in their constitution an anti-gay marriage, proposition 8. if they were revote that today i think result would be dramatically different so the question is will the supreme court justice, in effect, count the states as it sometimes has in various contexts, cruel and unusual punishment or elsewhere, or will it look at other indices of broader public opinion and to what extent it actually thinks that public opinion matters. >> rose: measure the velocity of the change after not seeming to go anywhere for so long. >> when we started-- and i wrote the first piece in '89 in defense of this-- and for the first five years they laughed at you. (laughs) seriously. gay marriage? they were like -- they were laughing. and for the first ten years people forget this but it was the left that was -- that was opposed to this. thinking it was -- i was a patriarchal trying to join an in
, i suppose you can force the child to say, this is my friend, but it changes the definition of what it means to be a friend. that's, it seems to me, what supporters of proposition 8 are saying here. all you're interested in is the label. and you insist on changing the definition of the label. >> wow. gavin newsom. thank you for joining us. >> i didn't get that fully. i was thinking back five years ago when i fell in love, you know, with my wife now, jen. if i sat on my knee and said, honey, i want to spend the rest of my life with you, will you civil union me? i'd be here with a scar. the point being, that label means a tremendous amount. that symbol, marriage is what it's about. you can't have something else and call it equal. i mean, that's the whole argument against civil unions. they are something else. so with respect to chief justice, i just don't think he gets that. >> that argument was made by our cardinal who asked a small group of journalists. the word gay went from fred astaire gay to having a good time to being a homosexual. words change their meanings. >> to say it has
. the obama administration announced the proposed changes today: they would require two-thirds less sulfur in gasoline and a reduction in other emissions beginning in 2017. they also would set tighter pollution limits for new vehicles themselves at the same time. the e.p.a. says it would reduce premature deaths and improve public health for a minimal cost. but opponents say it could hit consumers at the pump by adding as much as nine cents a gallon. juliet eilperin broke this story for the "washington post" and she joins me now. welcome to the newshour. >> thanks so much. >> so why is the obama administration doing this, putting these proposals out there? >> there are a couple of reasons. one is the fact that they are requiring vehicles to be cleaner in the years ahead. they've basically reduced greenhouse-gas emissions from these vehicles. and so you will see between 2016 and 2025, the vehicles are going to become much more efficient, get more piles -- miles per gallon. so one of the things automakers are asking for is for cleaner fuels because the sulfur in gasoline really affects the ca
. it will require a change in north korea's priorities, demanding that pyongyang will meet its obligations on denuclearization. this leads to a few important other principles. first, the united states will not accept north korea as a nuclear state. we will not compensate them for returning to dialogue. we will not tolerate north korea for bullying its neighbors. the united states cannot approve without improvement in inter-korean relations. in the meantime, at the u.s. diplomacy on north korea on a wide range of issues continues. close coordination with our treaty allies, including japan, remain absolutely central to our approach. we have expanded our engagement might develop a new dialogue key global actors who have joined the rising chorus of voices, calling on the dprk to comply with obligations. china does remain central to altering or korea's calculus, and close u.s.-china confrontations will remain a key focus of diplomatic efforts. while a denuclearized korea is a goal, so too is the welfare of north korea's 25 million people, the vast majority of whom bear the brunt of the governme
who fly for a living and some lawmakers. lisa is in washington watching reaction to this change in security rules. so, lisa, why the change now? and who has a problem with it? >> right. okay, first, why the change now. the leader of the tsa says they have been studying this for years and that they figured out through that assessment that knives actually no longer pose the risk of breaking into a cockpit, allowing a terrorist to take control of the plane or to blow up the plane. so the tsa says knifes like you see here are actually not a catastrophic threat, and these are the knives that tsa says will now be allowed. they are knives with blades that are no longer than 2.36 inches and they are also knives that do not lock in place. so that's why the change now. who has a problem with it? well, for one, senator chuck schumer of new york. add news conference today urging the tsa to change its mind. he said if it didn't, he might try to make them. >> if the tsa refuses to go along we would consider legislation and my guess is it would be large bipartisan support. i don't know anybody
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 297 (some duplicates have been removed)